Modern British women's perspective on cycling

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  • Nancy J Adler
    Professor, Organizational Behaviour
    https://www.mcgill.ca/desautels/nancy-j-adler

    Phone:
    514-398-4031
    Email address:
    nancy.adler@mcgill.ca
    Alternate email address:
    darlene.fowler@mcgill.ca

    Address:
    Bronfman Building [Map]
    1001 rue Sherbrooke Ouest
    Montreal, Quebec
    Canada
    H3A 1G5

    Degree(s):

    PhD, Management, UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles), USA
    MBA, UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles), USA
    BA, Economics, UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles), USA
    Area(s):
    Organizational Behaviour
    Link(s):
    Art & Leadership
    adlerartistry.com
    Office:
    327
    Biography:

    Dr. Adler is the S. Bronfman Chair in Management. She conducts research and consults on global leadership and cross-cultural management. She has authored more than 125 articles, produced the films, A Portable Life, Reinventing Our Legacy, and Leading Beautifully, and published 10 books and edited volumes, including From Boston to Beijing: Managing with a Worldview, International Dimensions of Organizational Behavior (5 editions), Leadership Insight, Women in Management Worldwide, and Competitive Frontiers: Women Managers in a Global Economy.

    Dr. Adler consults to private corporations and government organizations on projects worldwide. She has taught Chinese executives in the People's Republic of China, held the Citicorp Visiting Doctoral Professorship at University of Hong Kong, and taught executive seminars at INSEAD in France, Oxford University in England, and Bocconi University in Italy. She received McGill University's first Distinguished Teaching Award in Management and was one of only a few professors to receive it a second time. Honoring her as one of Canada’s top university professors, she was named as a 3M Teaching Fellow.

    Dr. Adler received the Prix du Quebec, Doctor Honoris Causa from Slovenia’s IEDC Bled School of Management, The Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal, the Center for Creative Leadership’s Walter F. Ulmer Jr. Applied Research Award, the World Federation of People Management Associations’ Georges Petitpas Award, and was named one of UCLA’s most Inspiring Alumni. She has been recognized with ASTD's International Leadership Award, SIETAR's Outstanding Senior Interculturalist Award, the YWCA’s Femme de Mérite (Woman of Distinction) Award, the Academy of Management’s (AMLE) outstanding article award, and the Sage Award for scholarly contributions to management. She was elected to the Fellows of the Academy of International Business and the Academy of Management Fellows, the International Academy of Management Fellows, and was inducted into the Royal Society of Canada.

    Dr. Adler has served on the Board of Governors of the American Society for Training and Development, the Canadian Social Science Advisory Committee to UNESCO, the Strategic Grants Committee of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, and the executive committees of the Pacific Asian Consortium for International Business, Education and Research, the International Personnel Association, and the Society for Human Resource Management's International Institute, as well as having held leadership positions in the Academy of International Business, the Society for Intercultural Education, Training, and Research, and the Academy of Management. Dr. Adler served as the co-chair of the Global Forum on Business as an Agent of World Benefit, co-sponsored by the UN Global Compact and the Academy of Management.

    Nancy is also a visual artist working primarily in water-based media. Her “Serendipity Suite” and “Reality in Translation:Art Transforming Apathy into Action” exhibitions were held at The Banff Centre and her “Going Beyond the Dehydrated Language of Management” exhibition opened in Montreal. Her paintings are held in private collections worldwide.
    Courses:

    MGCR 629 Global Leadership 1 Credits

    Group:
    Faculty
    Tenured & Tenure Track
    Research areas:
    Arts & Leadership
    Cross-cultural/Multicultural Management
    Global Leadership
    International Management
    Leadership Artistry and Arts-based Leadership
    Women as Global Leaders and Managers
    Selected publications:

    Papers in Peer-Reviewed Journals Books and Edited Volumes Chapters in books 
    

    Papers in Peer-Reviewed Journals

    Adler, Nancy J. (2012) “Leadership Artistry: Daring to Care,” Organizational Aesthetics, vol. 1 (no. 1), 2012: pp. 5-10.

    Adler, Nancy J. and Hansen, Hans (2012) “Daring to Care: Scholarship that Supports the Courage of Our Convictions,” Journal of Management Inquiry, vol. 21 (no. 2), pp. 128-139.

    Adler, Nancy J. (2011) “Leading Beautifully: The Creative Economy and Beyond,” Journal of Management Inquiry, vol. 20 (no. 3), pp. 208-221.

    Adler, Nancy J. (2010) “Going Beyond the Dehydrated Language of Management: Leadership Insight,” Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 31 (no. 4): pp. 90-99.

    Adler, Nancy J. & Harzing, Anne-Wil (2009) “When Knowledge Wins: Transcending the Sense and Nonsense of Academic Rankings,” Academy of Management Learning and Education, vol. 8 (no. 1), pp. 72-95.

    Adler, Nancy J. (2006) “The Arts and Leadership: Now that we can do anything, what will we do?,” Academy of Management Learning and Education, vol. 5 (no. 4): pp. 466-499.

    Adler, Nancy J. (2006) “La sagesse mondiale et l’audace de l’espoir,” International Management, vol. 11 (no. 1), Automne: pp. 79-97.

    Adler, Nancy J. (2008) “I am My Mother’s Daughter: Early Childhood Influences on Leadership Success,” European Journal of International Management, vol. 2, no. 1: pp. 6-12.

    Adler, Nancy J. (2002) “Global Companies, Global Society: There is a Better Way,” Journal of Management Inquiry, vol. 11 (no. 3): pp. 255-260.
    Awards, honours, and fellowships:

    Awards Fellowships Grants 
    

    Awards

    2013: The Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal.

    2013: International Academy of Management Fellow, Barcelona, Spain.

    2013: Legends of Diversity Honoree, International Society of Diversity and Inclusion Professionals.

    2010: Prix du Quebec, Leon Gerin Award.

    2010: Georges Petitpas Award, The World Federation of People Management Associations.

    2010: Academy of Management AMLE Outstanding Article of the Year, for Adler, Nancy J. & Harzing, Anne-Wil (2009) “When Knowledge Wins: Transcending the Sense and Nonsense of Academic Rankings,” Academy of Management Learning and Education, vol. 8 (no. 1), pp. 72-95. By 2010, “When Knowledge Wins” became the most highly cited article in management among articles published the same year.

    2009: Walter F. Ulmer Jr. Applied Research Award, Center for Creative Leadership.

    1996: Women of Distinction (Femme de Mérite), YWCA.

    1996: Sage Award for Scholarly Contributions to Management.

    1992: Outstanding Achievement Award from Women in World Trade, Boston.

    1990: Distinguished Graduate Teaching Award, McGill Faculty of Management.

    1989: International Leadership Award, American Society for Training and Development.

    1985: First Distinguished Teaching Award, McGill Faculty of Management.

  • Hi Bikeinfantry - why do we have the cv of Prof. Adler?

  • Hi DeerMaN!

    Because she is into research on emancipation - like the topic you started here on British women's perspective on cycling -, further more she is writing about women's liberation through bicylce culture.

    Culture on Two Wheels: The Bicycle in Literature ---- this subject on waffenradforums.net is here work!

    http://waffenradforums.net/index.php?p=/discussion/237/culture-on-two-wheels-the-bicycle-in-literature#latest

    It's about the equalising effect of mobility and the chance for women to discover the off-household world without restraints in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

  • edited July 2018

    Best example for woman on bycicle in the XX. century is Audrey Hepburn:







  • edited August 2018

    The ideal image of the modern, independent and emanicpated woman represented hand in hand with the bicycle she is using representing yet again the heavy industry leading the developed / first-class colonial "West" to success and world domination

    Note

    Automoto was a French bicycle and motorcycle manufacturer founded in 1902, which joined with the Peugeot group in 1930 and was fully absorbed by 1962. Prior to World War II Automoto sourced engines from Chaise, Zurcher, J.A.P., and Villers. Engines produced by Ateliers de Mécanique du Centre (AMC) were also used after 1945.

    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automoto

  • Besides the previous picture where ladies are shown to be real tomboy characters, in the late 19. and early 20. century it was more common to show - not only in bicycle commercials - how women need help... clearly a case of sexism from a nowadays point of view. But let's not forget that the naivity in all of this lies in the fact that nobody ever let them try any of these activities.


  • Next image is also highly fascinating!

    Basically what it sais is that a woman - at the time - on a bicycle is as free and independent as it can be. The stimulus is that the leash is just tbfore the moment to be dropped. Obviously representing that the woman - as an equal part of society - is bound to more formalities as men are.

  • The great escape!
    The epitome of all female gender / liberation acts. Often shown in movies and theatre
    from Ibsen's A Doll's House (1879) - although this woman is already established - to Kramer vs. Kramer, a 1979 American family courtroom drama film.

    A modern interpretation of this topic seen on the poster below - bride on the run - was performed by Julia Roberts in Runaway Bride in 1999.

  • edited August 2018

    More emancipation related posters:

    (let's note the marketing detail that women seeing this would support their male cycling partners and would eventually become part of the experience... as well as the impact on men - just like today - when they see products advertised with sexy curves, good looking idols, healthy people representing the lifestyle itself, or naked female body parts)







  • edited August 2018

    There is also the aspect of divine majesty! The bicycle - the chance of mobility itself - becoming something idolised. Godesses presenting the vehicle to the almighty, in other cases to the ordinary buyer or receiving the vehicle from above as a blessing!



  • Fascinating stuff Bikeinfantry!

  • edited August 2018

    Notice the women pointing towards the manufacturer or the product name (highlighting it with all their dynamics and posture) and the hips being "betont" as well as the kinky style of presentation. Yet we can see that the long skirt was adequately indoctrinated to not to scare away conservative audiences and potential buyers!




  • edited August 2018

    Pictures are diverse. Women are obviously not only showing up in commertials with the purpose to attract customers.

    Rosalind Russell (1950)

    France Gall on bicycle:

    The photo material from 50 to 100 years ago also shows are both the elegant - already independent - dama / madonna of the time, the upper class lady enjoying her mobility (also represented by the bicycle)...

    Georges Dambier- Ivy (1956)

    ... and the rough rider girl archetype, the racing woman!

  • There are many photographs, which depict the joyful female characteristics of participating in a group event, further more developing a hobby into a passion!

  • Second World War obvioulsy intensified this relationship:

    Flight Nurses in Britain

  • Claire McCardell on bicycle (1940)

  • edited August 2018

    Lucy's Bicycle Trip (1956)

    This episode of a CBS-TV series shows Lucy organizing a bicycle trip along the south coast of Europe. A mediterranean adventure.

    Lucy declares that she wants to travel from the French Riviera to Nice, France by bicycle. The rest of the group ends up caving to Lucy's demands, and off they go. When they arrive at the Italian-French border, Lucy can't find her passport.

    http://ilovelucyandricky.wikia.com/wiki/Lucy's_Bicycle_Trip

  • edited August 2018

    Women & bicycles during the War (1940-1945)



    1940s, Paris:

  • Cycling and Women’s Rights: A Lesson for Conservatives?

    I found this article in The Atlantic today: How the Bicycle Paved the Way for Women’s Rights.

    “By the 1890s, America was totally obsessed with the bicycle—which by then looked pretty much like the ones we ride today. There were millions of bikes on the roads and a new culture built around the technology. People started “wheelmen” clubs and competed in races. They toured the country and compared tricks and stunts.

    The craze was meaningful, especially, for women. Both Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton are credited with declaring that “woman is riding to suffrage on the bicycle,” a line that was printed and reprinted in newspapers at the turn of the century. The bicycle took “old-fashioned, slow-going notions of the gentler sex,” as The Courier (Nebraska) reported in 1895, and replaced them with “some new woman, mounted on her steed of steel.” And it gave women a new level of transportation independence that perplexed newspaper columnists across the country.”

    Full article: https://theconservativecyclist.com/tag/cycling-history/

  • edited October 2018

    Vogue Italy

    Τρίτη, 11 Ιανουαρίου 2011
    How rock can you be?
    Source: http://gogoleonessa.blogspot.com/2011/01/how-rock-can-you-be.html

  • Women shun cycling because of safety, not helmet hair
    by Helen Pidd

    It will come as little surprise to anyone who cycles that twice as many men as women ride their bikes at least once a week, according to research from Sustrans, the cycling and walking charity. Almost three-quarters of women living in seven major UK cities never cycle for local journeys, the study found. Despite this, over two-thirds said their home town would be a better place if more people pedalled. Some 76% of women who already cycled or wanted to start said segregated lanes would help them to cycle more.

    As a woman who cycles, I am often asked why so few others follow suit. Is it because of helmet hair? Or the bottom-amplifying effects of Lycra? There’s no doubt that women generally feel more pressure to look presentable than men. And although I’m rarely troubled by saddle sores, I find the logistics of cycling to work a right pain in the bum: the skanky showers, the outfit changes, the struggle to find somewhere discreet to plug in a hairdryer. And yes, I know that everyone in the Netherlands rides in their ordinary clothes, but I live in Stockport and work in Manchester: would you like to sit next to me unwashed after I’ve ridden 10 miles?

    The main reason most women don’t cycle in the UK is because they think it is dangerous. You can tell them until the cows come home that the roads are statistically safe, and that you are more likely to be killed walking than on a bicycle. But when they sit on the top deck of a bus and look down to see a cyclist squashed up against the kerb they feel no compulsion whatsoever to join them. Women do seem to be more vulnerable, perhaps because they are often more reluctant to “own” the lane and so end up in the gutter: 10 out of 13 cyclists killed in London in 2009 were women, and eight of them were killed by left-turning HGVs, according to the campaign group Cycling UK.

    For full article vist: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/jun/13/safety-women-cycling-roads

  • Center for Young Women's Health

    Bike Safety
    _Posted under Health Guides. Updated 20 June 2017.1. _

    Biking is an environmentally friendly way to get around cities and towns and a fun way to get your daily exercise. You just need to remember to follow the rules of the road and always wear your helmet (even on short bike rides).
    Why should I wear a helmet?

    Bike accidents can and do happen, even when you are very careful. In fact, each year thousands of children, teens, and adults require emergency care because of an accident involving a bicycle. Head injuries are very serious and can change your life in an instant. Many people die from head injuries caused from bike accidents each year. Wearing a helmet helps protect your head and your brain, but it doesn’t mean you should take risks or try fancy tricks. Leave that to the professionals!

    Ideally, it would be great if you could wear an outfit that protects your entire body when you go for a bike ride, but you can reduce the risk of brain injury by wearing a helmet that fits well. Bike helmets are not just practical; they can be stylish and come in lots of colors. You can even decorate them with reflective stickers that make you more visible to others on the road.
    According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, bicycle helmets are up to 88 percent effective in reducing head and brain injuries, making the use of helmets the single most effective way to prevent head injuries and death resulting from bicycle crashes.

    For full article visit: https://youngwomenshealth.org/2013/05/23/bike-safety/

  • edited October 2018

    How the Bicycle Paved the Way for Women's Rights

    The technology craze of the 1890s meant fashion freedom and transportation independence.

    by Adrienne LaFrance
    Jun 26, 2014

    he bicycle, when it was still new technology, went through a series of rapid iterations in the 19th century before it really went mainstream. Designers toyed with different-sized front and back wheels, the addition of chains and cranks and pedals, and tested a slew of braking mechanisms.

    By the 1890s, America was totally obsessed with the bicycle—which by then looked pretty much like the ones we ride today. There were millions of bikes on the roads and a new culture built around the technology. People started "wheelmen" clubs and competed in races. They toured the country and compared tricks and stunts.

    The craze was meaningful, especially, for women. Both Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton are credited with declaring that "woman is riding to suffrage on the bicycle," a line that was printed and reprinted in newspapers at the turn of the century. The bicycle took "old-fashioned, slow-going notions of the gentler sex," as The Courier (Nebraska) reported in 1895, and replaced them with "some new woman, mounted on her steed of steel." And it gave women a new level of transportation independence that perplexed newspaper columnists across the country. From The San Francisco Call in 1895:

    It really doesn't matter much where this one individual young lady is going on her wheel. It may be that she's going to the park on pleasure bent, or to the store for a dozen hairpins, or to call on a sick friend at the other side of town, or to get a doily pattern of somebody, or a recipe for removing tan and freckles. Let that be as it may. What the interested public wishes to know is, Where are all the women on wheels going? Is there a grand rendezvous somewhere toward which they are all headed and where they will some time hold a meet that will cause this wobbly old world to wake up and readjust itself?

    For full article visit: https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/06/the-technology-craze-of-the-1890s-that-forever-changed-womens-rights/373535/

  • Victorian passtimes:


  • 1920 - Waffenrads?

    Picture source: hiveminer.com

  • Welsh Women of World War One programme shows changing roles

    While millions of men packed up their kit bags and went off to fight in World War One, women were also vital to Britain winning the battle.

    Opportunities opened up to women in arming, feeding and policing the nation - posts previously closed to them.

    Historian Deirdre Beddoe explores the war's liberating impact on the lives of women in Wales.

    Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-36745523

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