Interview with Anders Rævdal & Julia Schmetzer: cycling in Denmark (stories,tips&recommendations)

edited June 28 in Rad Interviews

PART I. //

BikeInfantry:
We are sitting in Budapest. You have visited the city! And we managed to talk a little bit about cycling already, but I was keen on asking you a few questions. What about cycling at home, where you came from?
Anders:
I grew up in Denmark and I have been cycling since I was a very small child. I was thought to bike when I was 6 years old at least so I could bike to school and it was like 1 kilometer. So very short! Later on I biked longer and longer for the school. If it is closer than 6 kilometers it makes sense to take my bicycle! Denmark is very flat, we have some infamous hills usually. That can be bit of a challenge. They are not tall hills! The tallest point of Denmark is 40 meters tall, I think, 47 meters! So when I consider something a tall hill, it's maybe 10 meters high, 5 meters high. Over some time you can get realy sweaty when you bike, and it's always like the infamous hill way back in school where you always had to go through. Beside that it was… you just have a lot of time to think when you are just biking through the countryside.
Julia:
I grew up between Leipzig and Dresden. I also cycled to school. Actually I used my bicycle a lot! It was refreshing to take the bicycle, because you had a lot of time to think about many things and I still like it! April last year I bought a really big car, a nice car and then I met Anders and we moved together in Denmark and then I had to sell my car again. Now I'm jsut cycling and don't miss my car at all!
A.:
It was a big challabge to sell it!
J.:
It was a bit challenge to sell it, but that's another story! But, yeah, I don't miss it at all! I1m really happy for my bicycle!
B.I.:
There's a tricky question! You mentioned you are using her bike. Because of?
A.:
Oh yeah! Because I crashed with my bicycle! I had a lot of bicycles and they all got stolen all the time! Because I believed people won't steal my bicycle and somebody stole it anyway!
B.I.:
Is it customized or expensive?
A.:
My bikes usually… I had a lot of second hand bicycles! Medium range bicycles, like not the discount ones. I have found a lot of good offers. But the latest bicycle was kinda special! It was all aluminium.
B.I.:
What's the name?
A.:
It didn't have a name. It looked like something full of ducktape and lot of stickers!
B.I.:
How do you buy this in Denmark?
A.:
You have a supplier? Or you use facebook?
J.:
There are a lot of facebook markets where people sell their old bicycles.
B.I.:
Do you have a limit in Denmark how much private money can go from one person to the other?
J.:
I don't think there is a limit.
B.I.:
300.000 Forints per year and you get taxed?
A.:
I think it's 20000 Danish Koronas convertet… so that is roughly… adding two zeros… so that's one million... Forint! That's probably the limit that you can pass between two people.
J.:
But if you only allow to pay in cash up to 10000 Krone?
A.:
10000.
J.:
After that you have pay by digital card. So it's kind of documented, because people might have to pay some taxes and stuff like that!
B.I.:
I see.
A.:
But we implemented mobile pay in Denmark a few years ago, which means…
J.:
You know what mobile pay is?
B.I.:
I'm thinking.
A.:
Yeah. So it's… If you have a phone number you have an account.
J.:
No, you don't!
A.:
I mean if you sign up with your bank with your phone number, so somebody can send you money to your phone number! With the phone! So they can log in on the app and then you can type your phone number, type the ammount of money and send it to the other phone.
J.:
Which is connected to your bank account. So if I receive money of you, it's going to my bank account!
B.I.:
And then you get a message that this money arrived.
A.:
Yepp.
B.I.:
On your phone?
A.:
Instantly!
J.:
And you can pay like almost everywhere with it… in caffees, in bars.
B.I.:
You just put the phone ”there”?
A.:
Sometimes you can go like „beep” and sometimes you can swipe.
J.:
And sometimes they have a short phone number and put it in there…
A.:
Yeah, you just do that.
J.:
You just swipe other times.
A.:
You can pay to get like a four digit number, that's quiker to type for customers.
J.:
But you actually forgot to tell about why you bought a new bike?
B.I.:
Why did I buy a new bike?
A.:
Becasue the first…
B.I.:
Yes, we are driting! You use her bike because you broke one? Which was the new one with the aluminium.
A.:
I broke my aluminium bicycle, which I payed… it was very cheap!
J.:
But you bought this aluminium bicycle, which broke, you bought that because your other bike wasn't anywhere where you could remember you left it... (laughing) so...
A.:
No! It was stolen, wasn't it?!
J.:
No, it wasn't stolen!
B.I.:
Jeez…
J.:
Maybe it was, but we aren't sure! Maybe you just forgot it when you went hitchhiking!
A.:
I went for hitchhiking and then I placed it somewhere, and then when I came back… so usually when I go hitchhiking I go out to highway just for a short distance and then would come back and I just take my bike back to my home.

Comments

  • edited June 28

    PART II. //

    B.I.:
    You can leave the bicycle in Denmark at the highway and nobody will cut it off?
    A.:
    Apperently not.
    J.:
    But ääää….
    B.I.:
    Downtown they are stealing it and at the highway not?
    A.:
    At the highway they also stole it!
    B.I.:
    So you come back and there's no bike there?
    A.:
    Yeah, I was was very optimistic of putting it there!
    J.:
    Anyway, anyway, bidde, you were not sure if you left it there, or where it is…
    A.:
    I'm pretty sure of it! But it got stolen from there! And then I bought the aluminium bike, which is special, because it didn't have any gears! It had only one gear! And you could also bike backwards on it! Which is suicidal to have.
    B.I.:
    I know this gear system!
    A.:
    It's really suicidal! So I changed it, I changed the gearing. Still one gear, but it was free running! And then I also had to put some breaks on it and that's where I made a mistake of buying some breaks that were too big for the front wheel! Clamp breaks! A bit too long. So when you break really hard one of them can like go in between the… how do you call it, sticks in the wheel.
    B.I.:
    Spokes.
    A.:
    And then the front wheel stopped. Then the bike stopped. And then I continued for a bit. And then I stopped. On the asphalt. And that's where I broke my hand!
    B.I.:
    Left hand?
    A.:
    Left hand. The bicycle also broke! Cause it's made of aluminium, the weldings are not so strong! So the fornt fork and the steering wheel disconnected from the rest of the bike!
    B.I.:
    Pfff…
    A.:
    So it split in two.
    J.:
    Yeah!
    A.:
    It's only connected right now by the break cable!
    B.I:
    Were people watching you doing this stunt?
    A.:
    Yeah!! I was thinking what a few people saw?! Nobody came to my help though! I think they were just like: „What's going on?” I didn't cry. I just layed there looking around, nobody's gonna come and help me out!
    J.:
    But that's actually something really surprizing and it's quite shocking me a lot, because… if I imagine it would be me laying there I would be very happy about somebody helping me!
    A.:
    Yeah, but I'm a big strong male… so I picked myself up, put the bike on my shoulders and carried it home. And I was too late to put some bandage on my arm and then I helped to move…
    J.:
    Like literally moving stuff from Flensburg to Sønderborg…
    A.:
    But I only used my good hand for that, so… the other one was fixed. And in the evening I almost passed out, because it was hurting so much! So I went to…
    B.I.:
    Swollen?
    A.:
    Swollen! Swollen a lot! So I got to the doctor!
    B.I.:
    They fix it.
    J.:
    No, they didn't fix anything!
    A.:
    They put a cast on!
    J.:
    Because they were not sure about what it was actually!
    B.I.:
    And was there a specialist you told me about when we first hit this topic before the interview!
    A.:
    The story continues, yeah, yeah! So the doctor there was sure that something was wrong! But not completely sure! Broken? Or what was was broken? So they actually put a cast on it and told me to go to a specialist and meanwhile I got an x-ray! But they couldn't see on the x-ray what was wrong!
    So I went to another doctor, who touched my arm for like 2 minutes and then told me…
    J.:
    And that was in a whole other city!
    J.:
    Another hospital! So he had to go there for about an hour or half an hour?
    A.:
    Yeah it took...
    J.:
    Don't know, 45 minutes maybe!
    A.:
    Took an hour to get there and another to get home!
    J.:
    And maybe 5 minutes to look at the arm.
    A.:
    5 minutes.
    J.:
    And they couldn't do anything, they couldn't! And then 3 weeks later after this happened he got a note that the arm was broken!
    A.:
    I got an MR-scan!
    B.I.:
    So you didn't cycle afterwards for some time?!
    A.:
    Juli didn't want me to cycle for some time!
    B.I.:
    But you did? Or didn't?
    A.:
    … ääää… nah, I didn't cycle.
    J.:
    No.
    But… he got a helmet as a Christmas present! Because I was like, okay, when you go cycling again we should make sure nothing's gonna happen.
    B.I.:
    You stay alive, right?
    J.:
    But another thing is with this mentioned before bike, when he wasn't sure if he left it at some place!
    B.I.:
    Please continue from this part, that he must have left it somewhere, and he insists that it is stolen!
    J.:
    Thing is, there are so many bikes, especially in fron of the university, that you really can get lost! Sometimes I had it… like I parked my bike in front of the university when I went to quire when I did so every Monday… and then I come back and I can't find my bike, because I can't rember where this and that… there are so many bikes, you can't see it!
    B.I.:
    I've seen this in Leipzig as well!
    J.:
    Yeah! And that's why I put a yellow, what's this called, Klingel…
    A.:
    Bell.
    J.:
    A yellow bell with a humble bee on top of it, so I can find my bike! (laughing)
    B.I.:
    Are there many similar ones?
    J.:
    Way too many!
    A.:
    If there are 1000-2000 bicycles… if you forget where you parked it?
    J.:
    You can't find it!
    A.:
    Even if you have like a special bike! It's still a bicycle! An old bicycle looks like the same. And they are all black! They'll have a logo on them! And they become all very similar!

  • edited June 28

    PART III. //

    J.:
    And now I also bought in a second hand shop these bags for the bicycle.
    A.:
    For the saddle!
    J.:
    Yeah, which is in crazy 80's colours!
    A.:
    80's fashion!
    J.:
    Crazy pink… and yellow...
    A.:
    Crazy green!
    B.I.:
    So you recognize your bike by now!
    J.:
    Yeah!
    B.I.:
    And is there a problem in Denmark in the bigger cities that pedestrian parts of downtown / old town (narrow streets in particular!) are full of bikes and people cannot get through!?
    A.:
    Ahm… no! They… no, I wouldn't say so!
    B.I.:
    But it's full of bikes.
    J.:
    It is!
    A.:
    The people in these places have to park their bicycles! And there is a lot of space to park your bicycle, so they dedicated a lot of space, a lot of parts of the pedestrian road of the city center to be like a storage area for bicycles! Where it is convenient to park bicycles! So people usually park there! During once of twice a year… once a year at least the police comes and they take all the bicycles that just stand there…
    J.:
    Which stand there for longer, for a year!
    A.:
    After a year…
    B.I.:
    Are they documenting for how long a bicycle can stand there?
    A.:
    Yeah, so after a year, they generally put a tag on the bicycle and if the tag is still there in March, they take the bicycle!
    B.I.:
    Oh, they notice this bike isn't moved, please do something about it!
    A.:
    That's it!
    J.:
    But you are able to take the tag off! Right?
    A.:
    Yeah, if you haven't taken the tag off, then the police will take it and then it will be sold at an auction! Big private bicycle shops they buy the bicycles and take care of them if they need to…
    J.:
    That's really nice!
    A.:
    … but many bikes left there are just crap-bikes!
    J.:
    I experienced the same thing when I studied in Germany. At the university they had the same thing! They put tags on your bike and then you can just removed it, saying „Hey, I'm using this bike!” or the bikes where the tags are still on them for a longer time… they gonna remove them! I also think they fix them and sell them again to some people. It”s a good recycling concept!
    A.:
    My sister”s dorm had the same thing and the police took the bikes and put them in 3 piles! The pile of fixable bicycles, the pile with broken bicycles and the pile of bicycle parts! Really really really trashed bikes! So I went to the trashed bikes and the really broken parts, and there was a frame here and a wheel there… and I built my bicycle from that! But that also got stolen!
    B.I.:
    Why did they take that?
    A.:
    I don't know! My sister left it outside a mall for 5 minutes and then it was gone when she got back!
    B.I.:
    With a lock?
    A.:
    No, she forgot to lock it!
    B.I.:
    Well, that's… another story!
    A.:
    It's another story…
    B.I.:
    Here you cannot do that! Actually there are people – and I mentioned this the other night – who put trackers in bikes, inside the frame, and then the thieves are hunted down…
    A.:
    And then we have a lot of really really expensive bicycles, because people make it into a big part of them! Maybe 10% of people having bicycles buys really expensive bicycles! They weight maybe 1 kg, less than an old bicycle! They buy bicycle clothing so they can bike faster! But you imagine an old man…
    J.:
    It's so funny!
    A.:
    … really fat and he is wears skin-tight, wind proof…
    J.:
    (laughing out loud)
    … bicycle clothing! It's kinda funny!
    B.I.:
    With the airstream helmet!
    A:
    And sun glasses, which are really small! Made out of titanium, so they weight too much, but the guy weight 200 kilos, and he might be the CEO of … they are the CEOs of companies! They have bicycle consciousness! Really expensive...
    J.:
    Not only CEOs, but it's a status symbol! You can show that you have money and you can buy very expensive bicycles and very expensive like clothing and stuff! And it looks so crazy, because you know these people they don't do it very often! But they wear it!
    B.I.:
    Just to show off? You have this in Austria too! When people are going on organized trips bringing their expensive bikes or E-bikes cruising from one castle to the other, but it's 600000 Forints worth of equipment and the trip managers have to tell them „Dude, no… did you bring a lock?” Answer is „No, why?” They have the lock, which blocks the back wheel. How would they take it away, they think! They will put it in a truck! Here in Hungary it's more about the car as a status symbol!
    A.:
    And of course there is a hipster generation! So you can get a lot of bikes like really new bikes! They are new, but they look like they are from the 80's! So that's also becoming really popular!
    B.I.:
    Vintage!
    A.:
    Vintage bicycles.

  • edited June 28

    PART IV. //

    J.:
    Let me say something about the car thing, because you say it's a status symbol to have a car here!
    I think one of the reasons why in Denmark a lot of people, like many are cycling and a car is not a status symbol is because you have to pay one hundred… at some point it was 180, now it is at least 100% of the market price of a car in extras for taxes! So when you import a car from Germany for example, then you have to pay at least the market price or more extra in taxes just to have a Danish number plate!
    A.:
    So even old cars are as of from the rule twice the price of the normal market price!
    B.I.:
    And if you buy one in Denmark? With a Danish plate?
    J.:
    Then it's way more expensive as in Germany!
    A.:
    To get Danish plates on a car you need to… of course you need to own the car, buy the car, but you have to pay twice. The same amount for the license plate as for the car! And road texes!
    J.:
    This is how you finance the infrastructure in Denmark! And they are only able to do that, because Denmark is not producing cars! If they would be a Danish car brand…
    A.:
    Manufacturer…
    J.:
    … we wouldn't be able to raise that much taxes!
    A.:
    Of course they are all imported!
    J.:
    And I think that's the thing! Cause most people are not able to buy a bigger car, because it's way too expensive! People are cycling a lot!
    A.:
    It's also really easy especially in the cities. You get the freedom of a car, but without the expenses of the car. Everything let's say within 3 kilometers is within 10 minutes! So it's quik! The city we live in is probably 4 kilometers in diameter from border to border! Very small. But you can reach from end to end in 10 minutes! You cannot do it fast in a car! Cause the traffic lights will hinder you!
    B.I.:
    You will have to find a parking space!
    A.:
    You will need a parking lot! That alone in Koppenhagen is really expensive! And you need to get out of your car, you need to… it doesn't makes sense to drive a car often in the cities! In the countryside you will have to have a car! Cause the countryside…
    B.I.:
    The distances!
    A.:
    … the distance, everything becomes too far to constantly use a bicycle! But many hipsters and also some small families they are getting these bicycles that have really big trailer on them…
    B.I.:
    That's what I wanted to ask you! These cargo bikes, where you put the children in looking out on the front…
    A.:
    Maybe 1 out of 20 have it!
    J.:
    What is that?
    B.I.:
    You take the kids with that to school, no?
    A.:
    Yeah you can take them to school like this. Some people have a trailer behind the bicycle for the kids.
    B.I.:
    Like a tent!
    A.:
    It's like a tent. It has an aluminium frame, two small wheels, a tent and a Kissen in there. But some people create bicycles, but they are really expensive! But they are also cool, they look cool, when people come biking them. They are also fitted with electric motors now, so they just go up the hills like it is nothing!
    J.:
    But I do really enjoy cycling!
    A.:
    You do not? (mishearing)
    J.:
    I do enjoy it! On my way to work in the morning it's like very refreshing! I'm just ready when I come to work! I don't have to wake up, because I do it while I'm cycling! And when I cycle home, it's like I can…
    A.:
    Detache.
    J.:
    I can clear my head, while I'm cycling. I can think about the things that happened during the day! So I don't take all the things home with me.
    B.I.:
    You mentioned some children you arrange some games for! What about children cycling in Denmark?
    A.:
    I have my scout kids. These kids are 10 to 12 and most of them bike! They bike 2 kilometers to get to the scout club within in the city! It's around 10 to 12, sometimes around 9 when they start biking alone eithout the parents. But in the beginning from when they are 6 to 10, the smaller scout kids they will just come with their parents… on bicycles!
    J.:
    So he's talking about children or like youngsters who are living in the city and I am teaching in the school a bit outside of the city in a village. It depends on where the children live. If they live in the same village or if they come from far away! Because if they are living a bit further off then some of those are not allowed to cycle to school! Because they have to cross big road intersections. Parents feel like it's safer not to… just sending them by bus or deliver them to the school. And some are cycling every day! We also have campaigns from the „Kommune” where they are making big adverts about „Cycle to school”. I know Sønderborg Kommune, they also have this „Cycle to work” campaign, where they try to motivate you to cycle!
    A.:
    They have a competition every year in their workplaces. First you have a team, „who can get the most kilometers”!
    B.I.:
    How do you write this club you just mentioned, Dänfaas?
    A.:
    D-A-N-F-O-S-S. It's a major thermostat fabrication company, making also motors, the controll units, the controll motors for factories!
    J.:
    It's a very big and important company in Denmark. We have their main factory center in Sønderborg Kommune, they als ohave other places. It's around the world where they produce them?!
    A.:
    Then 2nd place, you know ABB?
    B.I.:
    Yes.
    A.:
    So they are competing with ABB! They are 2nd to ABB. Some of their products are Nr.1, but they are within the first two.
    J.:
    They even build a motorway, because of Danfoss, all the way to Sønderborg! It's around 30 kilometeres… but there's actually not that much traffic to Sønderborg, but because we have Danfoss, they build a really huge motorway through the landscape! They have a good infrastructure. Otherwise they would leave Sønderborg. They have lot of influence.
    A.:
    So they have these competitions. Many workers sign up for it. Many put a lot of effort into it as it becomes a game for the employees against each other! Juli, I think it would be interesting to explain the route and the road condition from your home to your workplace, what kind of like implemantation have they done throughout. Cause you need to cross a highway!

  • edited June 30

    PART V. //

    J.:
    It's actually pretty easy to cycle to work, cause we have a cycle road all the way from my place to my place where I work! But this path is crossing a motorway! So they made an under-motorway construction so you can pass under the main road!
    A.:
    A tunnel under the highway!
    J.:
    And above as well! It's really strange, it takes a lot of time to go (all) this way.
    A.:
    You go down the roundabout, up, cross the highway, over the highway under the other roundabout out on the other side.
    B.I.:
    Sounds complicated.
    A.:
    But in Denmark in many places you should be able to go from village to village on a dedicated bicycle road. You have the normal road, two lanes (one in each directions) and next to the highway 2 meters of grass and then 1,5 meters of bike lane in both directions. So there is a dedicated road made only for bicycles! This means cycling next to the road!
    J.:
    But cycling in Denmark is… they take it very serious! It's a very serious thing to cycle!
    A.:
    Cyclists think they really have to obey the laws! It means in Koppenhagen you really shouldn't walk in fron of a bicycle… they're not gonna have time to stop! They go fast! And they are very dedicated to be there on time, where ever they go!
    B.I.:
    One more question! Are there any recommendable routes through Nature / National Parks along the Sea for example. Routes you have tried even?
    J.:
    I would say down there where we live! There's for example Als (Als Fjord – editor).
    A.:
    There we have a track going along the island.
    B.I.:
    You have bridge, which goes to the island?
    A.:
    There is a bridge.
    J.:
    The island itself is around 30 kilometers in lenght and 20 in width.
    A.:
    The track is made for soldiers to walk down to the Danish border, but they don't use it anymore, so now it's a hiking track! An easy hiking track! There are many places where the bikes can't go, they kinda detour! So you can walk together with a bicycles and th epedestrains can go down and walk the seashore, while the bikes cannot!
    J.:
    And it already starts down at the border! Down at the German-Danish border!
    B.I.:
    It goes all the way around the country?
    J.:.
    Yeah. It goes about 40 kilometers to Als to our island and then all the way around. So that's actually quite nice!
    A.:
    I'd say I know a lot of people, a lot of Germans at least who have done the Berlin-Koppenhagen track, which is also really nicely paved! It should be really easy, going through a lot of nature!
    J.:
    In North Gemany I heard about this „Nord-Ostsee-Kanal”, I don't know what it is in English. Between the Baltic Sea and the North Sea there is a cycling path where you can ride from one to the other side!
    B.I.:
    What was this old Danish wall protecting the country, can you recall? Haithabu Danewerk? Crossed by the Heerweg, right? I don't know if you can cycle along the ruins or archeological remnants of that?!
    A.:
    Actually Denmark is a peninsula looking like a Pinguin… the highway goes on top of it through Denmark and I'm pretty sure there are a lot of bicycle routes going…
    B.I.:
    Øresund. The bridge?
    A.:
    No, it's more like the highland of us. So you can probably bike around the islands up and down.
    In the north it's really windy, we are a really flat country out to the Atlantic Ocean.
    B.I.:
    You have the wind mills… for a reason.
    A.:
    Yeah, but they don't stop the wind when you are biking. Basic rule is your should always bike form the West of the country to the East of the country! Because usually the wind is coming from the West!!!
    B.I.:
    For holiday cycling.
    A.:
    For holiday cycling, yes! And take a train home or I don't know what. You can do a round-tour including some islands, but the wind can be pretty fears and quite annoying! But it's part of the experience!
    B.I.:
    So what sort of clothes you recommend? Or what are you wearing yourself for cycling if you go out?
    J.:
    I would definitely recommend, as it's raining a lot, some rain-pants you can just wear on top of your ordinary clothing! And we found out, the best such pants have the long zippers, so when it starts raining you don't have to take your shoes off, you just open the zipper, and you hop in, and you close it and you can cycle.
    A.:
    I would say you need a scarf you can put around your ears also and your face! Because you can adjust it depending on how warm or cold it is! Since when you are cycling very fast it's the same clothes you would wear when you go hiking in the mountains! Because it get's really warm when you cycle a lot, and then as soon as you stop you get quite cold, cause the wind takes it all…
    B.I.:
    The moisture…
    A.:
    Yeah, you are sweatty, so you need something that is transporting sweat away from your body. That's really good! Something that is not too flobby…
    J.:
    I would suggest soft-shell! It's warming a lot although it's just a thin layer. So that's actually what I really liked! It helped me a lot! Just a soft-shell jacket, but rather longer! Down to the legs!
    A.:
    In Denmark we have a lot of waterfront! There are a lot of wooden shelters that you can borrow. In some you can jsut chill out…
    B.I.:
    Like a bungalow?
    A.:
    Similar to that…
    B.I.:
    Oh, it's not out in the woods?
    J.:
    It is out there in the middle of nature!
    A.:
    It's just a cabin where the wall is missing basically!
    J.:
    So you just take your sleeping bag with you and you can book the shelter on an app!
    A.:
    In some of them you can show up!
    J.:
    They have fire places as well.
    B.I.:
    You just put up your tent?
    J.:
    Sometimes that as well.
    A.:
    There is free firewood. Usually everybody brings his own firewood, but if you don't they'll always have some you can use a bit of! You should replentish! Go out in the forest, pick some firewood and put it to dry, and take some of the dry ones and burn it!
    J.:
    And by booking just make sure nobody else takes it! Because when you are planning a route you kind of have to make sure that the place where you go there's nobody else! Otherwise you risk to have to find another place and you arrive late in the evening!
    A.:
    The camp sites are really good also! Really well maintained!
    B.I.:
    Who's paying for that? It's just tax money?
    A.:
    Government money. Part of the Nature Fund! They also get a lot of EU-funds for that!
    B.I.:
    Anything else you want to say?
    A.:
    Biking recommended?
    J.:
    Yeah, I would like to recommend the lights, to have very strong ones!
    A.:
    Bike lights!
    J.:
    Because if you go out late in the evening or early in the morning, car drivers can be very ignorant sometimes! And they light up and you cannot see anything and it's very annoying! And when I have a very strong light, I just tip it up…
    A.:
    Flash them.
    J.:
    … so they can see it is annoying what they are doing and I'm stopping them.
    A.:
    And in the countryside the roads… it get's really dark in the countryside! And having a bike light that can show where you are going, that's really nice. So yeah…
    B.I.:
    Thanks guys!
    J.:
    That's all?
    A.:
    There's a lot of people always renting a bike in Denmark. And if you go to Denmark, to Koppenhagen especially, you should rent a bike! Cause it's the best way to get around Koppenhagen! I'm anxious to say it's the best way to get around Budapest!
    J.:
    But public transport in Denmark is very expensive! So it makes sense to rent a bike!

    Recorded in Budapest (February, 2020)
    Typed in and edited by BikeInfantry (June, 2020)

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